Tag Archives: I-CAR Gold Class

Why Certification Matters When It Comes to Auto Body Repairs

Autobahn

The Autobahn in Germany—full name Bundesautobahn, which translates as “federal motorway”—has no speed limits for extensive stretches of asphalt. Cars are known to reach astonishing speeds of over 190 mph. It takes a dynamic automobile, like a BMW 440x, to accomplish such feats. While thrill-seekers on the autobahn do not earn glistening trophies or champagne showers, pleasure and pride are their coveted accolades.

Driving a safe, high-end vehicle like a BMW or a Tesla does not require the acumen and training of an astronaut captaining a SpaceX rocket. Instead, in most modern-day vehicles the sophisticated computers and software, hybrid fuel configurations, and state-of-the-art built-in diagnostic and calibration systems function autonomously or can be operated with a mere push of a button, or even just a simple voice command. However, these complex, automated operations are akin to synapses in the human brain—easily susceptible to disruption when some other part of the car is damaged.

Six Amazing Subaru Design and Safety Features

Subaru in showroom

From the symmetry of their Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive system to the layout of the unique horizontal Boxer engine to the abundance of advanced safety systems, every Subaru vehicle is designed from the ground up to deliver the best driving experience possible. The infographic below will give you just a taste of the advanced features you will find in Subaru vehicles.

Keri Coach Works Auto Body Repair Certification Guide [Infographic]

Auto repair tools

Fender-benders and other types of auto body collision damage can’t always be prevented. But when they happen, don’t settle for anything less than excellence in having it repaired.

At Keri Coach Works, we strive every day to demonstrate our dedication to excellence in service to all our customers in Long Island, New York. One way we do this is by constantly staying abreast of the speed-of-light technological changes that are the hallmark of today’s automobile manufacturing industry. Thorough and ongoing training in the tools and materials needed to repair damage to vehicles involved in auto collisions is how we meet that goal. As our business has grown, so has the number of industry certifications we have earned. This infographic provides a handy guide to the types of vehicle makes/models our professional service technicians are qualified to repair.

(Click on this image to download a printable PDF of our Auto Collision Repair Certification Guide infographic.)

Subaru Certified: Why It Matters

Subaru showroom vehicle

A body shop is a body shop is a body shop. Right? Wrong! As with any human skill, levels of expertise and experience will vary from shop to shop and from individual to individual. Some mechanics are just better at it than others; and the collective skill of all the mechanics working at a single facility can vary—often significantly—from one to the other.

Interior of Keri Coach Works Body Shop in Westbury, NY
Keri Coach Works, Westbury, NY

Similarly, a car is a car is a car. Right?! Wrong again! A long time ago, in an automotive galaxy far, far away, when the car industry was relatively young, one vehicle was more or less indistinguishable from another. Sure, some makes and models were simply better than others right off the assembly line. Some were known for their superior performance on the road, while others could boast about their extra-eyecatching stylish or sporty looks no matter where they were.

But aesthetics and engineering aside, underneath it all most automobiles could be characterized as “generic”: that is, they were all basically a collection of seats inside a box bolted to a chassis mounted on a set of four wheels—a self-motile machine equipped with lights and mirrors, propelled by a petroleum-fueled internal combustion engine, and controlled by a steering wheel, gear shift, gas-pedal, and brake. If it broke down, was involved in a collision, or otherwise damaged in some way far away from the dealer from which it was first purchased, no problem! Pretty much any competent mechanic could fix it. And if it needed new parts, again no problem: a good many of those parts were more or less standard and interchangeable from one make/model to another, and could easily be obtained from any well-stocked auto parts supplier.

Well, those days are long past.